The Bear 100 Race Report

If you want old school, challenging and beautiful, you really don’t have to look any further than the Bear 100 in Utah.  You’ll be greeted at each aid station by some of the best volunteers, but don’t sit long or expect any coddling if you want to get this one done.

This wasn’t a last minute bad decision on my part to run this one, it’s been on my bucket list for some time.  It started when my friend Mark Scherr ran it several years ago.  It seemed like every time I talked to Mark he would tell me how I needed to go run the Bear and that he wanted to run it again too.  His excitement over the race was infectious, so it was soon on my bucket list as a race to run. This one was for you Mark Scherr, RIP.

My race pack to honor Mark

I signed up as soon as registrations opened and began putting together a team.  For me and big races, I really want the extra aid and to enjoy spending time with friends on the course.  My running partner and friend, Sherri Harvey immediately agreed to join me for this one.  Brad Goodridge has crewed for me before and having a crew chief you know you can count on was going to a big help. My parents were soon on board to drive down from Washington State to spend some time together before the race and be able to see me finish.  Later my husband, Ed and son Joey also made plans to come out and join the fun.  Ed would pace me in the last few miles of the race, and Joey had never been to one of my races before.

The race was still 10 months away, and to say the year 2020 ended up in a dumpster fire is putting it mildly.  I dealt with it not only as a runner but also as an RD.  I understood the challenges and struggles of having races during Covid and could appreciate all that it took to put on a race during these times. All of that made it a little hard to train not knowing for sure if the race would actually take place.  I just kept doing my thing but to say that I put in a good training block leading up to the Bear would be a gross understatement.

As luck would have it, or bad luck, 4 weeks to the day before the race I was in a doctor’s office getting a cortisone shot in my knee.  I was unsure if I’d be able to complete the race due to the pain I was having, and couldn’t really run.  I knew immediately on a run a couple days before that this might not be good.  I wanted to get it looked at and be able to, a) make a decision on whether I needed to pull the plug on the race and b) figure out what kind of situation I was dealing with. My doctor was super cool, he understood what I was doing, and we treated what looked to be just a lot of inflammation due to slight arthritis in my knee.  No tears or major strains, so after the shot it was an aggressive step down dose of Prednisone, ice three times a day and wearing a heavy brace on runs and during training. Over the next four weeks, the pain settled down and went completely away. I had a few test runs without a brace just before the race.  Major disaster avoided.

Let’s get this going, my nerves are killing me at this point!

The Bear 100 is an old school race.  It’s been around for a lot of years and it’s pretty low key but not small.  We were given bib numbers and assigned waves before the race.  Each runner had to text their bib to a number to check in that morning, line up in your assigned wave group, and they started them one minute apart beginning at 6am.  There was a huge crowd at the start with runners and crew. I chatted and said hello to a few runners I knew.  No announcements were made, just cheers as the first wave got under way.  To start the race, it’s about a mile or so down paved road.  Just enough to get you warmed up, but the climbing really gets going once you round the first turn.  You hit the trail in Congo lines and begin climbing for more than 5,000 feet over the next 9 miles or so.  It’s still dark so there’s not much to see besides the trail and chatting with the runners around you, if you can talk and climb.  This initial part of the course and first tough climb had me scared for weeks, so when I started to struggle with my breathing, I don’t think it surprised me but did make me start to panic.  I had been listening to runners behind me chat for a while and knew a local friend and runner from back home was just a person or two back.  I knew I was being pushed a little beyond my limits in the Congo line and asked Rich if he would mind stopping so I could catch my breath and stay with me for the climb.  He was super sweet to agree and we let a few groups by as we continued to make our way up the big first climb.  Finally, a sigh of relief once we hit the ridge line and got some of the first views in day light.

First Morning Views!  Doesn’t get much better!

Congo line near the top of first climb

Rich and I stayed together through the first climb and continued on for the first half of the race.  We both knew it would be a tough one.  The climbs and the altitude could all play a toll on how the day would go for either one of us.  He started out much stronger on the climbs and I became the push to keep us moving on the downs.  Rich was running the race completely solo with no crew or pacers. I would looked forward to getting to my pacer around mile 45.  But there was a lot of work to do between here and mile 45.  We came into the first aid station (AS) around mile 10 to very friendly and helpful volunteers.  We grabbed a couple snacks and drinks but kept moving.  By the next AS I knew I was going to need to get my stomach under control.  I think the altitude was beginning to cause some upset.  Luckily, they had a bathroom there I could use and I took some Imodium.  I knew keeping up with drinking and eating were going to be key, so I tried to keep after it.  The one thing you could always count on was fantastic views throughout the course.  There was always big climb but then some downhill to recover and make up some time.  That became the game of the race for me.  Struggling through the climbing part and trying to make up what I could on the downhill.

Finally some downhill!

Early on Rich and I knew we were somewhere near the back of the race.  The one goal both Rich and I had was to finish, and of course not chasing cutoffs would be a plus.  In and out of AS quickly and keep moving forward was key. Having someone to share the miles with and enjoy the incredible beauty was a bonus in my book.  When you have someone to chat with or just move along in silence, it seems to make the miles go by faster.  In the first half of the race, we worked together to not waste time but could not resist a few pictures to capture the experience.  With each section as the race progressed, I felt like I struggled more and more.  It was a slow beat down that makes you wonder how much can you endure, what more can this course throw at you.  The rewards were spectacular beauty, but they didn’t come easy for me.

Embrace the Journey!

Much of the details and rules of the race got changed in the weeks prior due to Covid.  When I had originally started my planning, we had 8 aid stations that crew could help you, now with new rules we could only see crew three times.  I can do a race without crew but for me it can be really helpful to have someone who is personally looking after you.  They can have my crew bag ready which for me contains almost anything I might need.  If something goes south, I can usually fix it. Late in a race having someone personally taking care of my pack and making sure I’m eating can be the lifeline I need.  This race had started out tough and seemed to just keep getting rougher.  I really began to look forward to having Sherri jump in at mile 45.  Rich and I talked a little bit about how having a fresh person to keep us moving and guiding us on the course would be a help.  I saw Brad briefly when we got to Sherri at Temple Fork AS, although he couldn’t crew me just a few words of encouragement from him was a lift.

We would see Brad again in 5 miles but knew the next few miles had some more steep climbs to grind out first.  It was now dark and it took Sherri a few miles to figure out the course markings.  It was clearly marked but not a lot of confidence markers between turns.  It seemed like the biggest fear became getting off course, doing extra mileage and losing time you knew you didn’t have.  Shortly before we got into the halfway AS at Tony Grove where Brad was waiting for us, Rich had fallen back just a couple minutes and started having his own stomach issues.

Brad had the “Red” carpet all rolled out for me!

Brad was ready and waiting with my personal AS all set up ready to go.  With the new Covid rules, he was only able to provide aid from his vehicle.  They did not want extra people around the actual aid tables.  At this first crewed AS he was not even allowed to enter the AS area until they knew I was through the previous AS.  Rich came in just behind us and got what he needed and pressed on out of the AS, said we’d catch him, which we did just shortly.  We had come into the halfway point about an hour ahead of the cutoffs.  Sherri had her game face on and was ready to push me hard to make up some time.  This next roughly 10 mile section became the place with more downhill than up, as Sherri pushed us to move as fast as we could adding an additional hour to the cutoffs.  I had wanted Rich to be able to stick with us but he fell behind shortly after we caught up to him and we knew we had to stay moving.  Sherri’s focus was to get me to Ed at mile 93 with at least an hour before the cutoffs so he could safely get me to the finish. With each AS and as the night miles and hours ticked on, that math got a little blurry.

Pictures don’t begin to do this course justice! They never really do!

I had made AS cutoff sheets for us which included how many miles to the next section, the cutoff time there and how much climb was in that section.  The sun came up and the relief of getting the head lamps off and getting to Brad again at mile 75 with our extra time still in the bank.  Then the charts we had were no longer correct.  I guess there was some changes made due to Covid and my sheets were no longer accurate.  Sherri thought that was helpful because when I knew there was a lot of climbing coming up, I’d get stressed.  Each section only gave you about a 2-hour window before the cutoff, most were 7 plus miles with lots of climbing.  We eventually had to quit the math and just go.  We’d find out at each AS how long to the next AS and just kept it at that.  It didn’t really matter how much climbing, you just had to stay moving. 

Sherri pushing me and enjoying the beautiful course!

As the race went on, I actually felt like I was climbing better.  I’m a consistent and fast hiker so I just had to move as fast as I could.  We came into some later AS and Sherri would just take my water bottle to fill it, I’d keep moving and she’d catch up with food Brad had given her to go.  I ate Humus wraps, Spring Energy fuel and broth to try and keep calories up, along with a few cokes at the AS.  We kept pushing to keep as much extra time before the cutoffs as possible and the final section leading into Ranger Dip AS where I would pick up Ed was an endless amount of climbing.  Sherri would call it the “road to heaven” because we were so high up, the highest she had been in the course. After all the endless climbing it was a short downhill to get to Brad and pick up Ed.  I had to grab some quick nourishment but we had managed to hang onto an hour and fifteen minutes ahead of cutoffs.

My husband, Ed now led the way and we would go up to the highest point in the race and the steepest climb of the entire course, but also a short 934 feet straight up.  Once to the top, I finally could sigh with relief, I knew I would finish, and I was spending the final miles of the race with Ed and enjoying every minute of it.  We chatted with other runners, took pictures and enjoyed what many told me would be the best views of the race overlooking Bear Lake, Idaho.  Those views didn’t disappoint and thanks to Sherri pushing me so hard we were able to take it all in.

I was reminded that God is good in the Hills and the Valleys!

The fall colors where spectacular and coming into the finish, seeing both Brad and Sherri who had helped me so much, along with my parents and my son is what really made the whole journey so special.  The race is low key with very little fanfare at the finish but the one thing that made my race was the people who I always know are there for me even in my crazy.  The family that supports me and the friends who probably understand the crazy a little better and share in it with me.

No Business 100 Race Report

This is probably a race I really had No Business doing, and I say that in all sincerity. I actually signed up for it when registration first opened up in 2017. That was long before I got into the UTMB lottery, which I never dreamed I would get into. I had run part of these trails with my friend Stephanie when we ran Dark Sky 50 miler together in May of 2017. That was the first year of the No Business 100 race and I was all over it but timing wise I couldn’t run it that inaugural year.

Knowing the 106-mile UTMB in August would be a huge challenge, I decided not to withdraw from No Business, but wait until after my race and see how I was feeling. I must say that my coach was not thrilled about me running again so soon, because her first concern was my recovery from UTMB. Nonetheless we made a training plan for me to recover well off UTMB, do a couple longer runs and taper way back before the No Business race. In return, I promised that if I wasn’t feeling completely recovered or my legs were still not there, then I would pull the plug and not run.
Let me also say something here about using a coach. I have loved my coach, and I use one because I trust them and feel strongly about the relationship we’ve developed. If she would have told me not to run this race, I wouldn’t have liked it, but I would have respected her judgment. Recovery is important to me (and my coach) and not just physically but mentally as well. I don’t spend money on a coach and then not listen to their advice and guidance. One of the most important things to me about a coach is that she believes in me. As runners, it’s nice to have friends and family say how great we are and encourage us towards our goals. However, a coach is much more intimately acquainted with us and our abilities. When a coach believes in you, it’s very empowering! Thank you, I love you Meghan!

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I’d lined up crew for No Business back in January, talked to Stephanie some about pacing me, and honestly didn’t give a lot more thought to the race. UTMB was my A-race and No Business did not get much attention until after I came back from Europe in September. That said, early on I did try talking her into signing up and running with me, but being the smart person that she is, Stephanie didn’t fall for my peer pressure. Then just a few weeks before the race, Stephanie gave in, and No Business 100 became her business as well. We already had crew, didn’t need pacers, or a place to stay; we were set. We were looking forward to a beautiful, “easy” race and not having to fight cutoffs like at UTMB. Of course, I’ve learned from experience that when a race gives you longer than 30 hours to finish 100 milers, it’s because you need that time. They aren’t just being nice.

Stephanie and I both went into the race feeling confident in our recovery and excited about the race. We had a solid plan and were ready to spend some more trail-time together. An unexpected rain fell much of the night before the race, so when we got up in the morning it was wet and chilly. We made small adjustments to our gear and what we would carry in our packs. The race begins in Blue Heron, Kentucky, also known as Mine 18, a former coal mining community on the banks of the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River. Tipple Bridge at the train depot marks both the beginning and the end points of the race. The course is one large loop, starting in Kentucky at Big South Fork and going into Pickets State Park in Tennessee and then back around into Kentucky.

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The race began on time at 6am, so we spent the first hour or so in the dark. It was a large crowd that narrowed right onto the long Tipple Bridge and an instant conga line ensued. The first few miles were a nice rolling single track and enjoyable to run. Stephanie and I began and ran comfortably for the first 15-20 miles in the upper-middle portion of the pack. We spent a few miles with our friends, Kirby and Caitlin, who went on to run at their pace after we began to take walk breaks on a long fire road section of the course. The road sections were very hard on our legs. Stephanie and I talked about how real the UTMB legs were, leading us to set a more cautious pace. For those who like numbers we ran our first 30K in about 8:15. When we saw our crew around 25 miles we were told we were about 1.5 hours ahead of the cutoff.

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The next time we saw our crew was in Picket State Park (42 miles in). There we took a few more minutes to change into dry cloths, got our headlamps out, and changed socks and shoes for the only time during the race… we also took advantage of the restrooms. Stephanie had started having some minor stomach issues, but they weren’t causing her to slow down. We’d maintained our 1.5-hour cushion on cutoffs and were soon off again feeling refreshed from our change of clothes and would see our crew again around mile 61.
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Stephanie’s coach, Alondra Moody was working the Bandy Aid Station at mile 61. When we arrived there, Stephanie and I were now only 30 minutes ahead of cutoffs. We needed to quickly take care of a few things and head back out. Alondra helped Stephanie get something for her stomach issues, hoping to settle things down for good. Once we were back on the trail, we began talking about how we could have possibly lost the hour. Looking at the cutoff sheet now, it was night time so normally you do begin to go slower. In that section we had just under 6 hours to cover approximately 20 miles, hitting three aid stations along the way. Again, for you math nerds that’s about an 18-minute pace, at night including AS stops. Even with quick stops you now have about 17-minute pace, at night with lots of climbing. Wherever our time went all we could do was get to the next AS 5 miles away and work with the time we had. Stephanie began to calculate that we had 14.5 hours to finish, as the race was really a 104-mile course. In short, we had another 44 miles or so miles to go in 14.5 hrs.

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Getting into the next AS at Grand Gap, there was a huge crowd with lots of people we both knew. Immediately we were asking about cutoffs… still just 30 minutes. At this point, Stephanie and I were stressed and frustrated. Chasing cutoffs is not a fun way to run, and we had felt we were running solid – pacing well, running all the flats and downhills, and only slowing down to climb. Having just completed UTMB 6 weeks prior, we were thrilled with our pace. We felt like our legs were good. Neither of us had foot issues to speak of, and only Stephanie with some stomach issues. If you are not a back of the pack runner you might not understand how it feels to run from one cutoff to the next, it’s a very stressful thing. On the one hand you are trying your hardest, not gaining on cutoffs. You don’t want to be cut, but you also begin to calculate how long until you slip up and miss. At that point, all your hard work is snatched right out from under you… STRESS!!!

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We had a 6.5 miles loop to do and back to that AS. Due to the increasing stress, challenges of nighttime navigation, and Stephanie’s stomach issues, I took over as lead runner pacing us during the night hours. Stephanie had paced us and pushed us well during the daylight, and now it was my turn to try my best to keep us moving at a good pace. During the last section of the loop Stephanie began to fall behind, but I kept trying to push us both. For a while I’d assumed Stephanie was the person running behind me. Once I stopped to check on her, I realized she’d fallen off and another runner was there instead. He advised me that he’d seen Stephanie some distance back throwing up. Being close to the finish of the loop, I was concerned that Stephanie would not be able to continue for long. I pushed ahead to the AS to get to our crew. It was the middle of the night and I knew if I continued the race, I’d be on my own. I wasn’t sure how much farther I could get before being pulled for missing the cutoff, but I knew I couldn’t just quit. My legs felt great, my feet were fine, my stomach was fine, we’d been eating good and running well to this point. Short of Stephanie continuing I was ready to keep moving. She soon came into the AS and told our crew, she was done. I was quickly headed out with still only 1/2 hour to spare. I would see our crew again in 7 miles.

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Alone, but more than able to run strong, I kept a solid pace. I ran as much as I possibly could, determined to make up time. One-by-one I passed people along the way; 10-12 runners in a 7-mile section. I got to the next AS thinking for sure I had made up time and was going to be OK. To my surprise, I arrived only to hear that I now only had 2 minutes to spare! All I could do was keep going. Now 80 miles into the race, there are 24 more to go. I’m unsure how much time I have to reach the next AS cutoff which is 9.2 miles away, so I grabbed food and ate on the trail. I chatted briefly with a guy I met in the race earlier in the day. He didn’t have any ideal about the next cutoff time and soon ran ahead and out of sight. I didn’t see any lights behind me after that.

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While I was determined to run solid, this section of the course was very technical, rocky, and now muddy, and messy trails. Rain had been falling for hours but now it was raining much harder. At this point, all I could do was focus, keep moving as fast as I could. Knowing that the odds were not in my favor, my hope of finishing were quickly fading. After being by myself for some time, I finally see someone behind me… soon I realize it’s the Grim Reaper and I think I might join Stephanie by throwing up! When the Reaper gets closer to me, she lets me know that the cutoff at the AS is 9:00. The bad news is that I’m on pace to reach it at about 9:15… now I’m really sick! I pushed harder, refusing to give up yet. It was so frustrating. I felt great, was running well but just could not get ahead. Then we came across another runner, I passed him and kept pushing. I might miss that cutoff but darn it, I’m not stopping until they stop me. We finally got to the water drop and I was thinking it was another 2 miles probably to the AS. The sweeper had no idea where we were or how far it was when I asked her. Another quick look at my watch and I knew it would probably take a miracle. I was still thinking it would take me until 9:15 to get there. Then the worst climb of the course is straight in front of me. It’s very steep, no end in sight and to make matters worse of course it’s wet, slippery and covered in rocks. Not an easy climb at 86 miles into a race. Now how do they expect me to make these cutoffs with this stuff? Even the 9:15 is looking bleak but I can’t give up. I knew my friends, John and Rebecca (who had been our crew at UTMB,) would be at this AS so I began looking forward to seeing them. I know I can finish this thing. I pass another guy as I continue up and up the hill. He’s sitting on a rock looking in rough shape and I feel his pain, but I can’t join him. I can’t lay down and quit.

Just before the AS one of the workers was there on the road, I think he may have been the captain. It was between 9:15-9:20 and certain I’m well over the cutoff. The first thing I asked was if there was any grace here. I told him how it was a rough section, but I pleaded that I knew I could finish it. When he asks how I’m feeling, I assure the captain that I’m feeling great. He asks for my number and trots ahead to the AS. When I arrive, there are John, Rebecca and the workers cheering for me. They want to know if I have a drop bag they can grab for me and what else I need to get out of there in 2 minutes. I drank some Coke, John put my headlamp in my pack for me, and Rebecca got me some food, and starting walking me out of the AS. The AS captain was told by the race director that the cutoff could be extended 10 minutes. Turns out the cutoff was 9:20, I was the last runner through this AS at 9:24.

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With 7.8 miles to the next AS, I have been assured by Rebecca that the worst is over, and I can finish the course. But, I have to get to the next AS by 11:55. The section begins with some good easy running and I’m gaining confidence that Rebecca was right. But over time the mud, creeks, slick bridges, it all begins to take its toll. By now I’m over 90 miles into this thing, and where the heck is that Aid Station? Just when you think you’ve got the race in hand, along comes another long endless climb! I know I must be close, but I just don’t know how close I am. I’m now too afraid to look at my watch. I swore when I got through the last AS I would prove I could get this race done and not miss this cutoff. At last I see it, I’m afraid to look at the time, but I have to… 11:48, I was never so relieved! I’m asked for my number (37) … “We’ve been waiting for you Number 37, you have two minutes to get out of here.” Now who can’t do the math, I had 7 minutes but I wasn’t going to argue.

Now an easy 2.2 miles to the water stop at mile 99.3 which has a cut off in 1.5 hrs and yes they tell me you do have to make it before the cutoff. So here’s where all that time was hiding. I easily make it there in 30 minutes with loud music playing and a whole AS and not just water. Super nice guys happily chat with me, getting me some broth and coke. Finally a huge sigh of relief. The long fight is nearly over. I finally know I’ll make it. I’m quickly on my way with 4.8 miles to go with around 2 1/2 hrs. I’m so happy, but my feet are sore, those rough sections have taken their toll. I’m no longer stressed and can enjoy the last 4 or so miles.

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It was sweet when I finally crossed the bridge to the finish… a smile on my face and friends there to cheer for me! Some finished before me, some left unfinished business out there, but they all celebrated my finish. It was bittersweet as Stephanie greeted me. We began No Business expecting to cross the finish line together, like UTMB. I have no doubt we will finish more races together.

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Final numbers for those of you still geeking out over them, 96 runners started the race, and 39 of us finished it, only 7 were woman, I finished in 32:21 and was DFL! If you are a real dork (David), last year they also had 39 finishers out of 96 runners who started.

If you are reading looking for more insights, details and information about this race, keep reading if not, carry on. This turned into a much longer report than I had imagined. So, let me share some after thoughts with you about this race and the course more specifically.

1. The first year of the race, 2017, it was run in the clockwise direction with this year being run counter-clockwise. A special buckle is awarded to those completing the race in both directions I think that prize brought back several return runners, along with runners who had some unfinished business from that first year. If you are reading this looking for information to run the race, keep in mind this report is from running it in the counter-clockwise direction. Looking at the finish times and talking to people who ran it both years, it might indicate that this was the harder direction.

2. It’s an absolutely beautiful course! If you want to run some of the most beautiful trails in the Southeast with rock overhangs, arches, lots of creek crossings, endless little bridges, some very technical sections, and lots of single track, you want to put this one on your list. The overall cutoff was 33 hours, and I would not be surprised to see them extend it in future years. It’s still a new race at this point and they are still working on making small adjustments. Believe me, they do want you to finish!

3. Your feet are going to get wet. No matter which direction the race is run there are lots of water crossings and you will get wet. The bigger ones are towards the end of the clockwise direction and the direction I did it, they were more in the first 1/2 of the race. I use Bag Balm and coat my feet before putting on socks. I did one shoe change and recoated my feet with Bag Balm at mile 40. Because of the rain, mud and constant creeks my feet stayed wet. My feet were in really good shape at the end, but I can’t promise what I did will work for you. Some people use Trail Toes and other products. This is just what I did and it worked well for me. Just so you know, you will have wet feet.

4. If you live close enough be sure to try and run some of the training runs the RD’s puts on. I can imagine that the more familiar you are with the course, the more helpful it would be. You can also run Yamacraw 50K which is held on some of the Kentucky trails, or Dark Sky 50 Miler which covers some of the Tennessee section. The course was fairly well marked at turns, lots of arrows and flagging, although I would say not heavy on the confidence marking. Once on a trail that didn’t turn off, it wasn’t overly marked. I think a few people may have complained and that may change in future years. My experience was you need to keep a close eye out for the markings especially late when you are tired. One missed turn can cost you time you may not have to make up.

5. Study the AS cutoff charts… a big fail on my part. I didn’t go in with a plan, just crew at five places. We had a cutoff chart but never really studied it or looked at it until we started running closer to cutoffs. It might have help to pay attention sooner to those.

6. If you like having pacers, you can pick them up as early at mile 40 I think. An extra set of eyes for trail markings and someone to keep you moving if you are a mid to back of the pack runner could be very helpful.

7. The AS are really awesome. Very helpful and upbeat each time you come in. They serve a great selection of food with lots of hot foods later in the race as well. I can’t speak highly enough about how well this race is put on.

8. The swag is also awesome. We got a very nice light weight North Face Hoodie, a buff, a pair of socks and some stickers. They also had additional technical long sleeve shirts you could buy as well as a couple of hat choices if you wanted a hat. Over all I thought they gave you a lot for your money. I might also say that the buckle is also very sweet, and if you finish the course in both directions they give you a second buckle that is very nice looking as well. You can tell they gave a lot of attention to details putting this race on.
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